12/6/08

a tumbling down





Last night at the art walk a couple came in and when they saw my clocks the woman said I should come to their farm and get some stuff as they are tearing the barn down in a week or so. That was the highlight of the night, it was a slow turn out, and not many people seemed like they wanted to chat. Unlike a 'gallery opening' the art walk is more informal and it appears that the other places in town showing art were clothing stores, restaurants or other smallish places. Since my work was in an actual art gallery I guess I still hoped for some gallery types coming in. It was a long three hours but I'm glad I went. It really blows my mind the work the gallery owners put into their space. Home made Christmas cookies as well as cheese/crackers and good beverages. I love the art in there, it's just too bad it's in the town it's in ~ the state it is in! They have such an eye for how to arrange work, I was thrilled looking at my clocks and my other work on the walls, very tastefully done and everything always seems to be just so, just right.

Anyhow, this morning with little sleep under our belts, Tod and I put on multiple layers of clothes and gloves, loaded up the 15 passenger van with cardboard, buckets and blankets and tools and took off. The van is the taxi places', and the owner let us use it, HOW COOL IS THAT! Plus, all the seats were out of it, unheard of, perfect timing, lets rock and roll! So we get there and see the barn which you see above. I was salivating until I realized it was empty and we were shown around various clumps of stuff which were on their way into the big portable dumpster in the driveway. I was a little bummed at first, but I was able to get a few things that honestly are gems (even if I have to wait til spring to wash and clean outside), as well as odds and ends that are good for baubles. If I wanted to brave the Hantavirus, I could have dug through tons of SHIT and retrieved wood and who knows what up in this odd attic type room off of the main house. We were warned in fact, questioned did we have strong immune systems before they took us up there. Apparently his father who died last Spring, was a pack rat and now they were getting rid of things. Stacks and stacks of stuff everywhere and loads of real crap from raccoons and mice and whatever else was using the space as a home.

We were only there two hours, but it seemed like more. It was cold and towards the end was so windy my eyes were pouring water to the point of ridiculousness. I looked like I was weeping and it stung my face so I was ready to split. Not the best photo opportunity either, the sun was in the wrong place at the wrong time but it was fun to take some pictures anyways just to say goodbye to a barn that will no longer be around very soon.

The husband took us around inside, he grew up here and showed us where he used to hide, this little cubby his dad would put him in. We saw a few barn implements and I finally found out what this one bauble I have is (everyone calls it the urinal but now I know it is this individual water basin for cows to drink from and they actually hit this lever to make the water come out into the basin). More piles of poop, rickety stairs, ceiling falling through and old hay everywhere still wafting that sweet dry smell. The 'gems' I got are these hay warming dryer parts. Very cool shapes and when it's warm out and I can wash them off I want to put them on the wall as is. I officially have no more room anywhere for things. I mean it. No more wall space, little basement space.....it's busting at the seems in here and I gotta figure out how the hell I'm ever going to be able to afford my own warehouse. There are hundreds of barns like this, and they are FULL AND ACHING TO BE EMPTIED by ME! I can feel it!

Until then. I better get to making some art and selling it dontcha think?

9 comments:

Michelle said...

A day treasure hunting, it just doesn't get any better than that!!

Philip said...

Great photos actually. I am really into 'decay' as it illustrates the passage of time. Great opportunity also - wish I could have been there.

Ellen said...

You really have a good eye. These are great pictures. I was stuck in traffic under a bridge in an industrial area today and was able to just look at all the discarded metal pieces,(had no idea what they were) and immediately thought of you and thought, I get it. I get the attraction to scavenge in these forgotten places and find these gems.

You do need your warehouse, space to store and expand and maybe begin experimenting with a big blow torch (because that would be fun).

self taught artist said...

yes decay is fascinating isn't it? and it IS like a treasure hunt. ellen i'm so glad you 'get it', it really is exciting to see this 'stuff' that you dont know what it is.
BLOW TORCH.....rubbing hands together in ignorant anticipation.

Liz Curtin said...

I was salivating at the thought of you climbing those stairs to the attic where all the good stuff was. I would have had my hip boots on and joined you til our noses fell off in the cold.

The shots of the barn are beautiful! I love old barns and buildings that are tumbling down..... they speak to me of passage and ritual and secret spaces........

Kim Hambric said...

I'm very curious about those hay warmer cover things. What could they possibly look like? Cow basin? Hmmmmmm. Perhaps there is a abandoned warehouse around you waiting to be filled up.

AnitaNH said...

Wonderful photos! I always feel sad to see old buildings in dis-repair, though. One of my neighbors barns fell in last winter.

self taught artist said...

i will take a picture of those hay warmer things kim, you have to see them!
funny i'm not into barns really as much as what is IN them. and even that is questionable. they really do have a lot of nasty stuff in them if not kept up. there is a regal beauty to them, akin to a 90 year old person.

sarala said...

I'm jealous. I keep seeing all these derelict factories I'd love to explore. Mostly it's not something I'd feel safe doing alone, though.