12/12/07

great art?

Saw this article today and had to post it. I have to say this picture to the right is interesting as well as the other paintings this person did...and then you find out a two year old did it and that his mother posted his work at Charles Saatchi's online gallery and he had big offers coming in.

It would be redundant if I said anything about this, because everyone else is already saying and thinking it. Isn't this something many artists have had to push out to their peripherals? I know I have. I think the biggest change in me lately is being okay with whatever anyone else wants to do. How does it serve me to critique anothers' work? It is useful only if I say to myself hell if THEY can sell something like that than by God I can make it too! That's the best way I deal with art that regardless of who made it and if I like it, strikes me as too this or too that. Were I able to remove myself from the work I have made what would I think? It is impossible to know and not something I need to focus on. I think for me the whole point is to keep reducing the stress or angst about the art world and try to find something useful about whatever it is that is 'challenging' me. It doesn't feel good to keep judging and thinking negative things, teaching myself to be a bit more open to other people's art allows for a little bit of learning and acceptance. So I look at this work and think regardless of who made it, do I like it? I do! And ya know what? The fact that a two year old made it is fantastic!

12 comments:

Daniel Sroka said...

Darn it, I knew I should have started earlier in life!

I think you have the right attitude. When I start comparing my work to others, especially work that is stylistically similar to mine, I begin stressing out. It's good to keep open, appreciate what's out there, and remember that my art is not about trying to be unique or original, but is about my experiences and impressions.

self taught artist said...

well put. I forgot to say it is the art critics/buyers that gives everything such pomp and circumstance that make things crazy....

Shelby said...

aye aye cap'n :)

Karen said...

Art. what is art what isnt art...That is one can of worms I dont want to get near! This lively childs painting captures such free spirit, it is energized. Kudos to the mom for seeing the possiblities.PFFFttt on the critics et all that make art snooty.
On another thought, I was going to comment on your 'tile' drawings a few posts back to say what wonderful little 'quilts' you designed.

self taught artist said...

karen, thanks for the quilt comment :)
couldn't help but to think of you cool quilters when I got out those old tile designs.

gigi_leonard said...

hi paula,

i just have to say that this art collection is beautifully composed and wildly exuberant. it totally makes sense that it came from some little kid with no agenda, ego or plan for world domination.

i actually think some of the best creative work can come from that place deep inside that children live in everyday and adults find much more challenging to find and revisit. the joie de vivre that comes from not having a care in the world and happily, effortlessly floating around your imagination is an extremely powerful thing. and to summon up the strength to convey and express that, at any age and in any type of medium, should not be a privilege exclusively for snooty tooty eyes only. it's about accessibility and inspiration and personal expression, isn't it?

lee said...

Hi Paula,
Thank you very much again, meeting one of those badgers in the pitch dark can be a little unnerving, they make really strange sounds like a bear or something, but their harmless and much smaller. this is a really interesting post, and if you think of the way a child looks at the world, it probably is far more interesting than some pretentious trendy person producing a mash of lines and color.
I love your piece of work called escape Paula, its really great.
talk soon
john

Kim Hambric said...

Art is definitely in the eye of the beholder. As far as those snooty, exclusive art critics . . . well, since its not politically correct to exclude Jews, African-Americans, Women, physically challenged from anything, there are certain people who feel the needs to exclude somebody. They choose to exclude those without the proper attitude.

Kim Hambric said...

Beware the 2-year-old child with the proper attitude.

Bob Johnson said...

Get out of town!!! this was done by a 2 year old, ??????? ?? ?, anyhoo, not really an artist, but I know what I like, unfortunately a lot of people like to be told what they like, you just have to keep doing your thing, try not to compete with a 2 year old? and know that there is a market for everything under the Sun and you are a part of under the Sun.

Daphne said...

What great conversation!

My thought was similar to other comments here. Why shouldn't a two year old make good art? They have none of the emotional limitations and rigid theory's that adults spend a life time developing. Honestly, which one of us artists doesn't need to find a place in ourselves that it more open to ideas and not question whether they are good or bad right away?

I've said it before but when I am working on art I feel the same sense of meditation I did when I was young and colouring in a colouring book. It isn't an intellectual feeling and it's a really good feeling.

Art critics are an on concept...intellectualizing something so sub-conscious...and yet we must feed the monsters to keep them satisfied and on our side...

San said...

Love this, Paula. To my eye, it's rather sophisticated. Wonder if this two-year-old dresses in black and has a fondness for film noir.