10/8/07

monday

Monday morning awoke to the sound of rain, as fog stretched thin before it dissolved. It is like
Christmas morning here, I worked on some RR Clocks last night and today I get to run in there to unleash one from the clamps I used to mount something onto it. I'm out of practice working on the clocks, I spent most of the day working on ideas and as is the case, I end up with four or five laid out as ideas pile up. I realize I need a mad dash to the scrap yard before it disappears under copious amounts of snow. There is a sense of last minute scrambling for materials and photographs before it's too cold to be out there.

One of my mini nightmares this fall was the realization that all of my RAW photographs that I took are not completely in focus. Up to this point I was taking most of my pictures in large jpeg format but now that I am printing larger pictures I need larger files. I took some TIFFS but last year I started taking RAWS. I would always have a copy made on the camera at the same time of a sm. jpeg so I could then look at it quickly and see if I liked the picture. Here's the thing I didn't know: Any camera settings I have (contrast/sat/sharpness etc) aren't used when taking the picture in RAW. So I would look at my jpegs and think GREAT!!!!! Get to working on the larger files and see just enough blur to know I couldn't print it large. So, I have three photo shoots of a few hundred pictures that are not quite right. So far my attempts at correcting it via my computer aren't working, a few shots are actually okay but all the others need tweaking. I'm bummed. The places I have gone to take these pictures have completely changed and the subjects have disappeared. Until I figure this out I can take TIFFS but they clog up the camera and the computer. If I had an SLR I would still have this problem but I think the camera would actually handle more as far as taking a better picture to begin with. Mine is the top of the line Olympus point and shoot and I push the boundaries on it as it is with the sorts of pictures I take. I know I need to sit down and really work on all of this but so far I haven't had the patience.


Hence the drawing. Until I get this figured out I keep myself busy with puzzle assemblages, clocks, and drawings. I'm planning on working on a series of the ladies. They are in the prototype test stage. It has taken a month at the printers (which is has almost driven me mad) to get it scanned and printed. Now another three weeks to have it laminated on the MDF board. One of the reasons I wanted a scroll saw was to be able to use it on my drawings. I plan on cutting them out with it and having an army of these figures....what I will do then, who knows? My friend who is the owner of a coffee shop is interested in showing my pen and inks. I love that her cafe is located inside of an old Victorian house, the walls always have amazing art by local artists so I'm happy to have a chance to show some smaller, less expensive works there. I had them all on my website but wanted to keep the site a little less cluttered. Depending on how this series goes I'll post more.

7 comments:

Chelle said...

I especially like the last two drawings. Wish I had suggestions about the photo issues, but I don't.

Daniel Sroka said...

If a photo is out of focus, saving it as a JPEG or raw makes no difference. The "sharpness" setting on your camera merely changes the sharpening applied to the image -- it will not fix photos that are out of focus. Often an out of focus picture will look fine on the little LCD on the camera just because it is so small.

self taught artist said...

I dont think I'm explaining it right...but the settings on the camera for the jpeg look great on my computer...the raw images don't look the same on my computer as the jpeg copies. does that make sense?

Daniel Sroka said...

Sure, it makes sense. When you take a picture using JPEG, the camera "bakes in" all sort of settings (exposure, sharpening, white balance, etc.) that are not set for the raw file.

You should only shoot raw if you want to be able to muck about with editing all of those settings after the shoot.

self taught artist said...

thank you dan for the emails explaining this further. really appreciate it!

Bob Johnson said...

Paula, you are a multi-talented artist, love your drawings!

Clare said...

Hi Self Taught! Your drawings are fantastic!! Great lines and curves! I love all the internal details, too -- really rich and beautiful.
:)